Synchromy I Norman McLaren I 1971 I install shot of exhibition Kinesis I 

Synchromy I Norman McLaren I 1971 I install shot of exhibition Kinesis I 

Promotional material has arrived for our next exhibition Kinesis opening 5 July 2014.
We are glad to be apart of McLaren 2014 a nationwide programme celebrating the life and work of Norman McLaren.

Promotional material has arrived for our next exhibition Kinesis opening 5 July 2014.

We are glad to be apart of McLaren 2014 a nationwide programme celebrating the life and work of Norman McLaren.

A taste of things to come - Are you LOCATIONALIZED by Tatham & O’Sullivan part of GENERATION: 25 Years of Contemporary Art 
image courtesy of the artists

A taste of things to come - Are you LOCATIONALIZED by Tatham & O’Sullivan part of GENERATION: 25 Years of Contemporary Art 

image courtesy of the artists

Assistant Curator Gayle talks to Art in Scotland TV about Broad Reach. This was filmed earlier in the year with artist Ceara Conway’s (our first artist) display in the background.

Making shimmering Space #Broadreachproject :


I had the most pleasurable experience and honour of scooting up to the lovely Taigh-chearsabagh Arts Centre to facilitate an Outer Space Sculpture making workshop, with local artist Margaret Maclellan and the very talented and hardworking weans of Uist ,as part of the Artists Rooms programme, #Broadreachproject. 


We took great inspiration from Vija Celmins  beautiful works in the gallery and the #letstalkaboutspace songs and inspirational talks of the day and with a pile of junk , a mound of glitter and sparkles and some  fluorescent paint and inflatables , we began to imagine and create our very own space-scape. The children lead a series of constructions to build a moon scape, several spacecrafts , astronauts ,aliens ,stars, galaxies and planets.We even managed to create a telescope to look out to our own skies with!


Running from 12-6pm , we had around 16 children ,varying in age from 3 - 15yrs ,some of the children were colouring and pasting in details for hours in order to create the perfect component for the scape. Their dedication was most impressive.Sticky and glittery we assembled our pieces on a line against a dark sky backdrop in the studio and played with the sparkling cosmos in the light. Both older and younger ones provided assistance and support for one another , such great team and patient work was carried out all day. I was most impressed with their ambitious works  and clever and creative engineering!

It was a fine wee shimmering day of Space-inspired making !

Many thanks to the Taigh-chearsabagh team for having me up to get involved with the fun and to Margaret for all her help and encouragement during the session.

I hope to come back and visit those little budding creative stars again soon!

Over and out.


Greer  

Let’s Talk About Space, Vija Celmins ARTIST ROOMS public programme.

Touring the schools on the islands of the Outer Hebrides

Written on the 8th of May 2014

Today we performed at the last school on our schedule, as part of the Vija Celmins ARTIST ROOMS public outreach project.

It’s been a tremendously rewarding experience touring all the various schools across the many islands that make up the Outer Hebrides. There are clear differences in culture, religion and geography that help me to distinguish the experiences. Some of the schools had clearly been there for some time and some were brand new. The constant throughout was the reaction from our audiences of pupils and teachers.

Wherever we went, we were met with warm welcomes and occasionally some lovely school dinners.

It made me think back to when I was in school, and of whether I would’ve reacted as strongly to the performance if I was a child in the audience. For some of these children (especially the Primary 1s and 2s) they would’ve never heard anything of the sort about the Universe and our place in of all this. It’s a particular positive to think we might have ignited that spark of fascination about the Cosmos.

So we thank all of the schools that welcomed us in and took part in the ARTIST ROOMS project, we’re glad to have come and talked about Space. 

Chris McGarry

Let’s Talk About Space

After Let’s Talk About Space’s performance the children at Balivanich school (Benbecula) wrote some awesome ‘tweets’

Final weekend of Let’s Talk About Space culminating in a day-long celebration of our celestial cosmology with performances by LTAS, workshops led by Greer Pester and a talk by number one Dark Skies Man Steve Owens.

Final weekend of Let’s Talk About Space culminating in a day-long celebration of our celestial cosmology with performances by LTAS, workshops led by Greer Pester and a talk by number one Dark Skies Man Steve Owens.

'Art is the thing that makes life more interesting than art.'

 

Sometimes it is quiet work that moves us most intensely. Starting out as a painter back in 1960’s California, internationally renowned Latvian artist Vija Celmins is perhaps best known for her meticulous and detailed renderings of ‘found’ imagery. Paintings, drawings and prints of ocean, moon, desert and snow reflect the artist’s long held fascination with surface. Drawn from the Tate Gallery’s ‘Artist Rooms’ project, this exhibition, (curated by Emma Nicholson of Atlas Arts, through ‘Broad Reach’ -with Taigh Chearsabhagh), presents a number of Celmins’s drawings and prints, selected to resonate with aspects of the natural environment here in the Uists. Most depict star-filled night skies mapped through tiny points of light within fields of intense darkness, evocations of infinite space. In other works, the cosmos presented in reverse appears at first glance to be a delicate, apparently random graphology. Closer consideration reveals − counter-intuitively − an equally absorbing visual echo of deep space. There is something profoundly moving and wordless about these quiet works. A subtle, yet powerful dynamic is at play, engaging and distancing us in turn. Celmins attributes this to the ability of an image to ‘invite you in’ − into the space depicted, whilst the visible actuality of making, (described by the artist as a ‘mapping’ of the original), ‘keeps you out’. Our recognition of the surface on which the image is made, negates the spatial depth portrayed. It is, she says, to do with ‘intimacy and distance’. The utterly captivating, ‘Ocean Surface Woodcut 1992’, a year in the making, provides a magnificent example of this contradictory dynamic. Typified by a restrained and subtle aesthetic, Celmins’ practice is self- evidently skilful, labour intensive, and highly accomplished, but great art does not reward merely through impressive commitment and technique. For Celmins the work is about looking, intense looking. Resist the urge to seek or project meaning, engage with that intensity of looking and this remarkable work has the capacity to synthesize something of what it is to be here on earth. Friend and fellow artist Robert Gober, in conversation with Celmins, recalls the following quote, (but not who said it), ‘Art is the thing that makes life more interesting than art’. (Vija Celmins, Phaidon, 2004 p.26). What better position from which to appreciate this beautiful and enigmatic exhibition?

Celmins quoted from the ‘In conversation’ event held April 23rd 2014 at Taigh Chearsabhagh Museum and Art Centre.

Sophie Morrish is a Uist based artist who takes the landscape she lives in as inspiration, not for romantic or nostalgic reasons but for the opportunity it affords of visceral engagement with the ‘more-than-human’ world. 

View her current project here http://sophiemorrish.blogspot.co.uk/2014/05/1730pm.html